Raspberry Pi time!

Although I have had the pi out and working once before, it’s been a while and there’s a new distribution out for the software, so it was like starting all over again: the first thing I needed to do was to download and unzip the new distribution (Raspbian wheezy) from the pi website.  This needs to be copied onto an SD card before you start.  You have to use a disk imager to set up the SD card, it can’t just be copied over, but I’d already downloaded a free disk imager ready.

pi with case

pi with case

The operating system for pi is a linux distribution, with a graphical interface very like Windows available. It also comes preloaded with several pieces of software such as Python and Scratch, making it very fast to get up and working for programming purposes.  It took about 20 minutes altogether to download the software and copy it onto the SD card ready for use, and then I could start plugging things in.

The pi comes with two USB sockets which are usually taken up with keyboard and mouse, and as the operating system is installed onto an SD card which needs recreating for a new setup, this time I was also trying out a powered USB hub, so that I can save any work I do onto a separate memory stick rather than on the SD card.  The Pi itself isn’t powerful enough to run a hub, so it has to be one with its own power supply.

I hit a major problem when connecting the screen – as I explained in an earlier post, I need to use an adapter to connect my screen to the pi, and it had a rather troublesome connection, but eventually we managed to get it working.  So I had the pi up and running, with powered hub running keyboard, mouse and memory stick, and with a cable draped across the room to the router to give an internet connection as well.

I was disappointed to note that this new distribution seems to have a lot less than the previous one in the way of preloaded software, but the essentials are there – web browser, python 2 (with pygame) and python 3 (without pygame), plus Scratch.  Squeeze is also listed, but didn’t seem to load up.

There is also a folder of python games, taken from the book Invent With Python, which I copied onto the memory stick to bring back to my main machine and look at.

The browser seemed to work with no problems at all, and it was as easy as plugging in the cable and typing in a web address to get online with the Midori browser, so that was the basics up and running, although I couldn’t see how to access the memory stick directly from applications such as Scratch – my husband said something about mounting the drive, but I felt copying over is enough for now, until I get to the point of using the pi properly and having files worth saving directly onto the external drive.

I feel now that maybe I’ve reached the point where I need to start looking carefully for instructions, either via the MagPi magazine or some of these books that have sprung up about the pi, in order to take it any further.  Scratch and Python are fine with no issues for me, but the operating system is a little unfamiliar for anything outside the very basic and I’m not confident enough to go poking around, downloading stuff and installing it without advice.

I do believe the pi is a wonderful gadget, but as yet I don’t think I’ve identified its full purpose – as a really cheap machine available to encourage kids to play with programming, it’s great, but apart from its price it doesn’t offer that much different from a desktop machine. I understand you can use it for input and output devices, rather like the arduino, but that again is something that would need research and setting up, although it does seem to me that one major advantage for the pi apart from price is the physical size of it and that seems to be begging to be embedded in some sort of system.

I think it’s time to go off and do some research into what people are using the pi for, and what it’s capable of!

PS the case is great for protecting the pi as it sits on  my desk – I found it on my husband’s desk (around his pi in fact! shh!)

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About emmyleigh
Writer/editor/proofreader who loves technology

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