Gamemaker and GCSE

gamemaker environment

Gamemaker environment, with list of assets on the left and a room displayed

One piece of software that I’ve enjoyed playing with is Gamemaker. This is a 2d games engine, reasonably easy to use, that can produce games to be uploaded to the website or given to friends as a stand-alone executable file. Gamemaker Studio is the latest version, and is available in a feature-limited free version, an academic version or full professional version. Note that I’ve changed the skin – I find the new default skin (appearance) of the Gamemaker environment very hard on the eyes, and the monochrome effect makes it harder to identify the different icons (You can’t say the blue or the red circle when every single button is in green or grey!).

Gamemaker is a step between Gamestar Mechanic and Scratch or Greenfoot: it is mostly drag and drop elements with settings, rather than scripting (although there is a scripting option) but with more flexibility than Gamestar Mechanic – the interplay of the objects is completely within the creator’s grasp, and there is the full ability to add your own assets: graphics, sound etc.

While Gamemaker serves well as an introduction to programming concepts, it is not a programming environment; rather it is a tool to introduce logical thinking and game making skills.

Using Gamemaker

The Gamemaker environment consists of a list of assets: sounds, background images, sprites, objects, rooms etc. Note that here a sprite is a graphic file, while an object is something that can be added to the game, whereas in Scratch the costume is the graphic and the sprite is the thing that can be added. Each room is one screen (e.g. level selector, start/finish screen), or one game level.

The man object, showing the Event/action interface

The man object, showing the Event/action interface

The basic syntax of Gamemaker is Event -> Action; When this happens, Do this. The creator chooses an event that may happen, e.g. When colliding with… When keyboard <X> pressed… When No more lives left… and then orders the actions that should take place as a result. In this example, the man is designed to move in a maze. He should respond to key presses by moving in the appropriate direction, and should not move when he hits a wall or when no key is pressed.

The direction can be seen/set by double-clicking on the Move in Direction button.

A game can be built up by creating more and more objects, setting their behaviours appropriately and adding them to the game room.

One way to introduce Gamemaker is with a set type of game with recipe cards for extra objects to add in order to increase complexity. Lower ability children can follow the recipes exactly while more able children can start to experiment with settings, and as they gain experience in different types of games they will naturally mix and match.

I find the easiest way to start students on Gamemaker is to start with a maze game. The first objects needed are an avatar and a block to act as the walls. Once the objects are created correctly it is a simple matter to add to them to a room to  create a maze to explore. Then extra objects can be added easily, such as coins to pick up, a door to move to a next level and a bomb or moving enemy. This works especially well as the first step up from Gamestar Mechanic, as the principles of the game/level design should already be understood. With lower ability students, I have created the basics of the game so that they start with something very similar to Gamestar Mechanic, and once they have created the object to move to a new level they work independently on level design while waiting for support to create further objects.

Strengths of Gamemaker

Where Gamemaker excels over Scratch is its built-in facilities to handle things like lives. As it is purpose-built for games, commands already exist to deal with such common features, and it is as simple as saying Event: No more Lives -> Action: Restart game. The game will then finish automatically and restart.

Games such as platform games need a lot more thought, and many objects will stretch children’s ability to work through logically, although features like the built-in gravity property of objects help considerably. Children with low ability/experience will still have high expectations, and so balancing what they want to be able to do with what they can actually achieve by themselves can be a challenge. On the other hand, some children really take to Gamemaker and quite happily explore options by themselves and there are teaching materials available if you look around (some on my site). There are two very good books, The Gamemaker’s Apprentice and The Gamemaker’s Companion, but these are fairly technical and require a good level of ability in order to access them. They are also written for earlier versions of Gamemaker, so might require some checking/adjustment.

Using Gamemaker for coursework/assessment

I looked into using Gamemaker for GCSE and similar qualifications, and found mixed results: OCR GCSE ICT contains a unit on creative use of ICT, for which the solution can be a multimedia presentation, multimedia web pages or a computer game, so using Gamemaker would be a valid way of fulfilling the unit. Other GCSEs did not appear to have that facility, however. Edexcel offers a single and double award ICT, for which the double award contains a unit comparable with the Creative Use of ICT in OCR; information on the types of tasks covered is limited, but the Examiner’s Report suggests that the expectation for a game-based solution would be a scoring system, rules to play/win, single player or turn taking and the ability to include user-created assets, so that would suggest Gamemaker is indeed a viable option.

Other exam boards appear to focus on business use of ICT or traditional multimedia such as web pages or presentations. Even BTEC ICT overlooks game making as a valid use of multimedia, focusing instead on graphics, animation, video, sound or programming.

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