Picking up the pieces

codeword throwing an errorIt’s been a while – a hectic six weeks of term, until finally we’ve reached half term and I have time to try to pick up the pieces of my technical developments and see if I can make progress with them.

I left a few projects hovering: there’s the virtual pet that I started in Scratch and app inventor, the Simple Simon game that I made in Scratch and started to convert to app inventor, the general learning I was doing with Python and the codeword project that I started in Python.

It was the codeword project that’s been my ambition for longest, and the project that I remember as the furthest developed, so that’s the one I’ve opted for first. And there I hit my first problem.

Just in trying to pick up the pieces of this project, I’ve learned several things: that it’s really hard to pick up a complex project after so long, that without any real structure it’s difficult to pick it apart and get an overview, and that with no log of changes it’s hard to even find which version to use! I’ve got versions of the file from codeword to codeword6, plus codeword4a and codeword4b. I’ve gone back to codeword4b, as that contained a note saying it was the latest – but of course there’s nothing to say I didn’t progress further and just not remove the note. I remember the project being workable via command line codes, but now it doesn’t seem to respond to even the simplest of commands.

This blog is probably the place I’ve documented my project the most, so I guess I’ll have to read back and see if it’s any help. In the meantime, I really need to pick the code apart and understand it thoroughly, and produce some sort of map or algorithm so that I know how it all ties together – although algorithms/flowcharts become rather complicated when they’re event driven rather than procedural!

In the meantime I’ve learnt that even the most straightforward of projects needs to be thoroughly documented and planned before coding, and that actively writing and testing code is just a small part of any software project. Managing your code so that it can be easily understood and followed, and leaving some sort of explanation to progress, and building in error checking are also incredibly important.

I’ve also proved the point that software needs concentrated effort to get to grips with, and picking it up only for a short while can be counterproductive, as it can take so long to catch up with where you were that you never actually have time to make proper progress. On the other hand, maybe  little and often isn’t too much of a problem – but little and seldom definitely is a no-no!

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